Prototype Images

Overview

For comparison purposes, images shown below were captured (as noted) simultaneously using either NexOptic’s 5-inch equivalent aperture Proof of Concept Prototype Telescope, or an industry leading Schmidt-Cassegrain 5-inch aperture telescope.

All images were captured in March of 2017 near Tucson, Arizona and were all subject to similar image processing techniques.

Images

Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 in March 2017

Processed Image Captured with 5-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain on March 22, 2017

Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 on March 22, 2017

Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 in March 2017

Lightly Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 on March 22, 2017

Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 on March 22, 2017

Processed Image Captured with 5-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain on March 22, 2017

Processed Image Captured with Prototype SN01 on March 22, 2017

Video

Field test of NexOptic’s proof of concept telescope prototype containing Blade Optics™.

Unprocessed lunar image captured with the prototype, in real time.

Posted on Apr 7, 2017
Field test of NexOptic’s proof of concept telescope prototype containing Blade Optics™. Unprocessed lunar image captured with the prototype, in real time.

Image Processing Description

For the purpose of creating comparison images, identical image processing methods were applied to both the industry leading 5-inch aperture Schmidt Cassegrain telescope and the 5-inch equivalent aperture diagonal Blade OpticsTM Prototype telescope. Near Tucson Arizona, in March of 2017, both devices were mounted on the same tripod. Several fields of the moon were imaged with each device. Each field was imaged 9 times in succession.

The 9 images for each field were processed to create a median image. The fields were then stitched together to create the lightly processed images shown above.

A second process first applied a reconstruction filter (Lucy Richardson deconvolution) to a single color channel of an image from each field, and then stitched these fields together to create the processed images.

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